Teaching tools

Educational game 6-8 years

Educational game  6-8 years

The 6- to 8-year-olds are given a game booklet adapted to their age, and go through the museum answering amusing questions that help them amass a wealth of information on the King’s House building, the city’s development, the River Senne, the canal and the fountains, as well as Manneken-Pis of course.

The teacher or accompanying adult is given a specific booklet containing the answers as well as useful additional information.

Educational game for 6-8 year olds (pdf): € 1,50

Follow-the-trail game 9-12 years

Follow-the-trail game 9-12 years

The 9- to 12-year-olds are given a game booklet adapted to their age, and go through the museum answering amusing questions that help them amass a wealth of information on the King’s House building, the city’s development, the River Senne, the canal and the fountains, as well as Manneken-Pis of course.

The teacher or accompanying adult is given a specific booklet containing the answers as well as useful additional information.

Length of visit  : +/- 2h
Educational game (pdf): € 1.50 per child / Adult booklet(pdf): € 0.50

J-L Petit, Brussels in the Middle Ages 1

J-L Petit, Brussels in the Middle Ages 1

Urban area: birth and development, The Brussels Files, 2012

This file deals with urban development in Brussels in the Middle Ages, a subject which has been studied in depth in many publications, but has not been revisited in a more accessible form for a long time. There have been many theories and much historic research has been carried out over time. So it is important for the public at large to be informed of the current state of knowledge.

To make the information more readily available, urban growth is described in different key periods, highlighting the main districts which make up the modern ‘Pentagon’ of Brussels.

This file also contains some reproductions of exhibits in the Museum of the City of Brussels (Maison du Roi) which can be used for teaching purposes with the aid of a series of standard questions.

Urban area: birth and development (pdf)

J-L. Petit, Brussels in the Middle Ages 2 & 3

J-L. Petit, Brussels in the Middle Ages 2 & 3

The face of the city en the city's power, 2 and 3, in The Brussels Files, Brussels City Museum, 2016

What was Brussels like in the Middle Ages? How did it gradually come into being? Which of its buildings enhanced its prestige? What did its homes look like? All very natural questions if one is interested in taking a practical approach to life in a great mediaeval city, but hardly easy to answer. Although major historical studies of a number of emblematic monuments have been made, a great deal remains to be done concerning the other aspects of the city’s physiognomy. There are few iconographic sources, and what documents there are require a measure of caution, as they are taken from the work of artists whose primary objective was not a faithful rendition of reality. Although the extant information can be complemented by archaeological excavation, contemporary texts and comparisons with other, more intensively studied cities, we are still all too often forced to resort to pure speculation and many areas still remain unexplored. As for the handful of mediaeval buildings scattered across the city, they have undergone frequent transformation over the centuries.

To complement, we have drawn up an itinerary to enable visitors to seek out Brussels’ chief medieval remains and imagine their original aspect, as well as note their more remarkable features.


The face of the city en the city's power (pdf)

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